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Busy Signal pleads not guilty to charge of absconding bail

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JULY 6TH,2012

Embattled Dancehall/Reggae entertainer, Glendale Gordon, more popularly known as Busy Signal, has pleaded not guilty to a charge of absconding bail in his ongoing case in the United States.

The internationally acclaimed singjay answered to the charge of failing to appear in court during a hearing on Monday in Minnesota before the presiding judge ordered him detained, pending trial. Said charge stems from an accusation that Busy Signal fled the United States in 2002 so he could avoid an upcoming drug trial.

According to assistant U.S. attorney, Andrew Dunn, Busy Signal fled before his trial was set to begin in Minnesota, making him a fugitive for the past decade. The prominent artiste had been slapped with a pair of charges related to cocaine trafficking in February 2002.

Should Busy Signal be convicted on the count of absconding bail, he could face up to five years in prison.

This news comes a month after Busy was detained by members of the Fugitive Apprehension Team at the Norman Manley International Airport in Kingston after being deported from the United Kingdom, where he was initially arrested after being suspected of using false documentation.

Two days after his arrest in Jamaica, the Kingston Town singer waived his rights to challenge his extradition to the U.S. in order to fight the charge of failing to appear in court.
Though the cocaine charges remain active, the extradition request for Busy Signal only pertained to the accusation of absconding bail. Should American law enforcement officials want to prosecute Busy Signal on the drug-related charges, the U.S. and Jamaican governments would have to work out those terms as a result of treaties in place between both countries.

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